tabloidization

1. Tabloidization (as a controversial theory) is a long-term transformation of the contemporary media, when media „devotes relatively little attention to politics, economics and society, and relatively much to diversion like sports, scandal and popular entertainment." It devotes relatively much attention to the personal and private lives of people (both celebrities and ordinary people). A second sense involves a shift in the priorities within a given medium, away from news and information toward an emphasis of entertainment. Finally: tabloid is „not a particular kind of media output, but of the content with which it is filled." (Colin Sparks 2003).

2. „Tabloid” as a term also refers to a particular size and shape of a newspaper.

Sparks, Colin (2003): The Panic over Tabloid News. In: Sparks, Colin & Tulloch, John (2003): Tabloid Tales. Global Debates over Media Standards. Lanham, Rowman and Littlefield. 9-12. p. See the Online Edition

Chandler, Daniel–Munday, Rod (2011): A Dictionary of Media and Communication. Oxford University Press. Oxford. 420. p. See the Online Edition

For further reading:

Gulyás, Ágnes (2003): The Development of the Tabloid Press in Hungary. In: Sparks, Colin & Tulloch, John (2003): Tabloid Tales. Global Debates over Media Standards. Lanham, Rowman and Littlefield. 111-128. p. See the Online Edition